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Sadie Peachey

 

Sweet Nostalgia For Sadie Peachey of The Amish Baking Company, cooking and baking are a family tradition. Peachey and her brother, Nate, use their mother’s recipe to make vanilla-glazed doughnuts, which they sell from their food truck at Phillippi Farmhouse Market and at festivals all around the country. (They sell about 600 a day at the Phillippi market.) “We’ve incorporated sourdough into the recipe because that’s how my mom baked growing up,” says Sadie. The result is an enormous, pillowy, yeast-raised doughnut that’s dripping with vanilla glaze.

All in the Family Peachey and her eight siblings grew up Amish on a big farm in Statesville, N.C., and baking was such a big part of their life that their father—who now lives in Sarasota and owns Big Olaf (and who is also a practicing Pinecraft minister)—built a bakery on their farm. “My mom and us eight kids would bake for local markets,” Peachey recalls. “That’s when I learned to make bread, cinnamon rolls and doughnuts.” In 2002, Peachey and her family moved to Sarasota; although she and Nate are no longer practicing Amish, they named their company The Amish Baking Company out of respect for their family heritage.

 

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On the Road In 2007, Peachey says she and Nate decided to “take the doughnut mobile” and applied to become a vendor at the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta. “We drove from Sarasota to New Mexico just as an adventure, to see what would happen,” Peachey recalls. The festival was a huge success, so they decided to venture elsewhere. These days, they’re at such events as ithe Florida State Fair, Florida Strawberry Festival, Okeechobee Music Festival and Bonnaroo, in Tennessee, where Peachey recruits more than 50 friends and family to help feed the thousands of attendees. They’ve also developed quite a following. “Some kids who had our doughnuts at Bonnaroo drove [to the Florida State Fair] from Michigan!” she says. “That makes it all so worth it.”

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