One of the drawings included in the pre-application for MainView Sarasota.

Image: Gigi Ortwein

A new mixed-use high-rise could be coming to Main Street. Deividas Gizys, the president of Development & Growth, recently presented plans to demolish a single-story building at 2051 Main St., Sarasota, and replace it with a 10-story mixed-use project called MainView of Sarasota.

Gizys submitted pre-application materials to the City of Sarasota last month, and went before the city’s Development Review Committee in early June. If the project goes forward, it would include 36 condominium units, 10,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor, 90 parking spaces on the second and third floors and residences on the top seven levels. The majority of the residences would occupy the north side of the building and the retail space would front Main Street and Wallace Avenue. A garden rooftop pool area would offer what Gizys calls "a 360 degree view of what Sarasota is."

The rooftop would be intended for residents. However, Gizys says it may be made available to the public, as well.

Ahead of the pre-application meeting with the city’s Development Review Committee, city staff noted the project team would need to document more details before they might determine whether the proposal is in line with building regulations. Development review planner Amy Pintus’ comments included the need for a detailed plan for the roof, and pointed out that a loading zone was blocking a driving lane, among other items.

According to Gizys, when built, MainView Sarasota could help connect downtown with the east side of Washington Boulevard, which is occupied mostly by law and administrative offices and the Sarasota County jail.

“If you’re on that end of Main Street, you’re either paying taxes or getting your friend out of jail,” says Gizys. “The goal is to build an urban, pedestrian-friendly destination point and revive the area, which is dead right now.”

Although the plans are still in the very early stages and are expected to shift, Gizys says sustainability is a priority, with possible elements like vertical gardens, ride-sharing accommodations and green building certification.

“It might be one of the top sustainability projects in the state, if not in the country," says Jonathan Parks, an architect with Solstice Planning and Architecture who has worked on the proposal. "You can only save so much energy in a residential house, but if you can take those principles to a 10-story project, you can see real impact." Solstice has designed the Art Ovation Hotel and The Overton, among other buildings.