Susan Burns (Lori Sax)This is our women’s issue, and most of our stories and departments highlight the accomplishments of local women. We had no idea how relevant this special focus would be when we conceived the idea to do a women’s issue last winter. But this spring, women’s issues were front and center as (mostly male) politicians and pundits weighed in on what’s best—in the areas of contraception, abortion, parenting and working—for the gender with the two X chromosomes.

It’s frustrating. These were the same issues I grew up with in the ’70s. I believed back then that by the time my daughter was ready to enter the work world (and, as a college junior, she’s almost ready), women would have achieved control over their bodies and their decisions, and would hold parity with men in the corner offices in government, politics, sports, education, medicine, media and just about every other profession. But despite the fact that today women graduate in larger numbers from college and that we outnumber men in graduate programs, we’re still a long way from achieving that sort of power, or even equity in salaries.

One of the women leaders we profiled—state Sen. Nancy Detert—said, "The issues would change if there were more women in office." It takes courage and conviction to run for office, or to run a business. All of the women we profiled are mentors. We can learn from them.

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